Интервју за „Париску ревију“: Вилијам Фокнер

William Faulkner

Вилијам Фокнер

У наставку следи одломак из интервјуа који је амерички нобеловац Вилијам Фокнер дао за књижевни часопис Париска ревија (The Paris Review) у пролеће 1956. године. Пишчеви одговори могу бити корисни онима којима је књижевност фасцинација, било да је у питању реципирање или стварање исте. Такође, они су значајни и са поетичког становишта јер су одговарајуће полазиште за приступ његовом делу док су, истовремено, бритки, духовити и налик афоризмима.

Теорија књижевности не мора нужно бити изложена пред читаоце својим специфичним лексичким и синтаксичким језичким апаратом већ може бити дата у одговорима који, попут романтичарских афоризама и фрагмената, имају стваралачки и креативни потенцијал. Фокнер одговара на питања која су у вези са одговорношћу писца, са садржајима његових романа који су утемељени у личном искуству, са његовим односом према сопственим делима.

INTERVIEWER 

Is there any possible formula to follow in order to be a good novelist?

FAULKNER

Ninety-nine percent talent, ninety-nine percent discipline, ninety-nine percent work. He must never be satisfied with what he does. It never is as good as it can be done. Always dream and shoot higher than you know you can do. Don’t bother just to be better than your contemporaries or predecessors. Try to be better than yourself. An artist is a creature driven by demons. He don’t know why they choose him and he’s usually too busy to wonder why. He is completely amoral in that he will rob, borrow, beg, or steal from anybody and everybody to get the work done.

INTERVIEWER

Do you mean the writer should be completely ruthless?

FAULKNER

The writer’s only responsibility is to his art. He will be completely ruthless if he is a good one. He has a dream. It anguishes him so much he must get rid of it. He has no peace until then. Everything goes by the board: honor, pride, decency, security, happiness, all, to get the book written. If a writer has to rob his mother, he will not hesitate; the “Ode on a Grecian Urn” is worth any number of old ladies.

INTERVIEWER

Some people say they can’t understand your writing, even after they read it two or three times. What approach would you suggest for them?

FAULKNER

Read it four times.

INTERVIEWER

How much of your writing is based on personal experience?

FAULKNER

I can’t say. I never counted up. Because „how much“ is not important. A writer needs three things, experience, observation, and imagination—any two of which, at times any one of which—can supply the lack of the others. With me, a story usually begins with a single idea or memory or mental picture. The writing of thestory is simply a matter of working up to that moment, to explain why it happened or what it caused to follow. A writer is trying to create believable people in credible moving situations in the most moving way he can. Obviously he must use as one of his tools the environment which he knows. I would say that music is the easiest means in which to express, since it came first in man’s experience and history. But since words are my talent, I must try to express clumsily in words what the pure music would have done better. That is, music would express better and simpler, but I prefer to use words, as I prefer to read rather than listen. I prefer silence to sound, and the image produced by words occurs in silence. That is, the thunder and the music of the prose take place in silence.

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